Nebraska

Covering the Emigrant Trails of Nebraska

The North Platte River

1/7 The North Platte River

Fort Kearny

2/7 Fort Kearny

Windlass Hill

3/7 Windlass Hill

Ash Hollow

4/7 Ash Hollow

Chimney Rock

5/7 Chimney Rock

Robidoux Trading Post

6/7 Robidoux Trading Post

Scotts Bluff

7/7 Scotts Bluff

Emigrant trails from "jumping off" places in Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas were scattered across eastern Nebraska, but converged at Fort Kearny. After leaving the Fort, the trails ran adjacent to the Platte River through central Nebraska, then crossing the south branch, followed the north branch of the Platte through the awe inspiring landmarks of western Nebraska.

Overview

The trek across eastern Nebraska must have been a relatively easy one for the Oregon-California- Utah emigrants. The rolling plains, the plentiful prairie grass, and the initially friendly Indians probably lulled the travelers into thinking this would be a carefree, though dusty and tiring, passage.  After a perilous crossing of the south fork of the Platte River and heading west, the travelers begin to see a very different landscape - one full of dangerous descents, canyons and rough terrain, quick sand laden river crossings, but also one of remarkable beauty.  The easily identifiable landmarks etched in the landscape of western Nebraska worked as a prairie compass clearly pointing the way. 

      Leadership

      • President: Amanda Gibbs
      • Vice President: Ted Heil
      • Secretary: Nancy Petersen
      • Treasurer: Barb Netherland

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